I want you to read this post. It’s been a labour of love and I want to help your business prosper. Telling you it’s about benefits-driven copy isn’t going to mean anything to you. But if I told you, by reading this post you’ll be a step closer getting potential customers to submit an enquiry form, give you a call, or make a purchase…

….Ha! I’ve got your attention.

You’ll now be more willing to take a few minutes of your valuable time to read on.

So how did I get you to read up to this point?  

Well, by letting you know, in no uncertain terms, the benefit to you by reading this post: You will improve your chances for more business.

Sell benefits and not features to convert your prospects

 

So, highlighting the real benefits of your product or service to your customers is a key communication device.

However, it is a tool which is often overlooked or used incorrectly. And why many business websites, for instance, have little impact in converting prospects into customers.

This is because confusion often lies in knowing the difference between features and benefits. The other challenge is how to convert the features of a product or service into meaningful benefits.

How to make sure your content is benefits driven

 

First, let’s determine the difference between features and benefits:

  • Features describe what your product or service does – such as the spec details of your product, quality, service, functionality, and price.
  • Benefits describe the customer ‘need’ your product or service fulfills – This could be a need to save time; save money; stay safe; be secure; be healthier; and so forth.
  • Hidden emotional benefits fulfill deep rooted needs. For example, the need to show-off;  prove we are wealthy; for novelty or something new; to be cosseted or feel relaxed; to be of help or to be seen to be generous; for association. Tap into an emotional benefit and you’re onto a winning proposition!
  • And watch out. Don’t mistake advantages for benefits – An advantage is what the feature does to eventually result in a benefit.  A smart phone has the Google maps app (feature) . The fact the app makes it easy to find directions wherever you are is NOT the benefit – it’s an advantage. But as a result, you’ll get to where you need to on time and with little stress (the benefit).

A tip on how to convert a feature into a bona fide benefit

 

The good news is there will be a whole bunch of benefits specific to your product or service.

And one way to identify a benefit  is by thinking through what customer need the features of your product or service actually fulfills.

You can do this is by using the words ‘which means that..’ after stating the feature.

Here’s an example in practice…

 

The features of our content creation service include – writing, editing, and refreshing content.

The advantages are the job is done efficiently and effectively.

Which means that ….

  • We save our clients the time and the resource of having to do it themselves.
  • Clients get peace of mind derived by hiring a professional who will produce relevant content which will meet their objectives.
  • There’s a  hidden benefit of efficiency. This fulfills the emotional need of client to whom anything that simplifies life and work is worth having.

These now make for strong selling points.

So if you want to improve your conversion rate, take some time out and go through all your customer communications and web content  (yes, ALL of it).  Then ask yourself: what exactly am I selling to my customers to get their attention?
Features or benefits? It’ll be worth your while.